USF's WebQuest 

Title: Quest for the Gold: An Olympics Webquest       

Author: Bill Warnken     

Student's Assignment

Introduction:

The modern Olympic Games are special.  Begun in 1896 by Pierre de Coubertin, they have grown into an experience of olympic proportions.  Certainly, the Olympic Games are watched in more countries by more people than any other event.  The glory of the games arrives with the fanfare of the Opening Ceremony and the lighting of the flame.  The thrill of competition, the exaltation in victory, and the camaraderie built through participation only extend the prestige of the games. 

Yet the Olympic Games have been fraught with challenges.  They have been influenced by most of the major (and even some minor) events of the 20th century, including racism, terrorism, fascism, Cold War politics, commercialism, cheating, and bribery.  Despite this, the games remain idealistic and noble, an experience shared by billions around the globe.

Task:

Students will be divided into teams to create an Olympic Hall of Fame and Museum.  The museum will consist of five wings representing the five colors of the Olympic rings.  In this WebQuest, the blue ring will represent idealism, the yellow ring success, the black ring courage and determination, the green ring inspiration, and the red ring failure.  Each team will be responsible for researching a specific Olympic era seeking examples of the five characteristics enumerated above.  Each student will be responsible for creating an exhibit to place in one of the five museum wings.

Process:

1.   The class should be divided into teams of five.

2.  Each team will choose a specific Olympic era to research and together answer all nine questions.  Questions should be answered on a separate sheet of paper in complete sentences.  All opinions should be supported with facts. 

3.  Students will complete the WebQuest by investigating links and completing at least 5 Research Data Forms.  All questions should be answered with facts, opinions, and other supporting information. 

4.  Teams will regroup to discuss their findings and determine which athletes or events best exemplify the five characteristics.  Remember, the blue ring represents idealism,  yellow success, black courage and determination, green inspiration, and red failure; one ring for each of the five wings in your museum.  As a team you will choose one athlete or event to include in each wing, and one team member to design the exhibit for that wing.

5.  Finally,  each team member will produce an exhibit.  For example, the student designing the wing commemorating idealism might choose to create a power point presentation, an Olympic poster, a monument, a  statue, a diorama, or an illustrated poem.  Exhibits will be graded based on the presentation of multiple facts in support of the athlete or event's nomination to that wing of the museum. Each exhibit must include a written summary.

Evaluation:

Grading Rubric

 

 

Skills

Garland

Bronze

Silver

Gold

Total

 

1 Pt.

2 Pts.

3 Pts.

4 Pts.

 

Team Questions

Some questions left unanswered, no support of opinions Most answers lacking support for opinions given. All questions answered in complete sentences and most opinions supported. All questions answered in complete sentences.  All Opinions supported.  
Research Data Form 1 Some questions incomplete; no facts given Some questions  answered with supporting facts Most questions answered with supporting facts All questions answered with facts, opinions, and supporting information.  
Research Data Form 2 Some questions incomplete, no facts given Some questions  answered with supporting facts Most questions answered with supporting facts. All questions answered with facts, opinions, and supporting information.  
Research Data Form 3 Some questions incomplete, no facts given Some questions  answered with supporting facts Most questions answered with supporting facts. All questions answered with facts, opinions, and supporting information.  
Research Data Form 4 Some questions incomplete, no facts given Some questions  answered with supporting facts Most questions answered with supporting facts. All questions answered with facts, opinions, and supporting information.  
Research Data Form 5 Some questions incomplete, no facts given Some questions  answered with supporting facts Most questions answered with supporting facts. All questions answered with facts, opinions, and supporting information.  
Exhibit Display Exhibit does not display one of the five Olympic characteristics. Names one of the five Olympic  characteristics but does not support Names one of the five Olympic characteristics with one supporting fact Exhibit clearly displays one of the five Olympic characteristics with multiple facts.  
Exhibit Neatness Obvious sloppiness, no straight edge,  poor penmanship, careless construction of exhibit Some of the exhibit is neatly constructed, but the majority is not Most of the exhibit is neatly constructed with a few exceptions Exhibit could be described as students best work.  
Exhibit Summary Incomplete, lacking introduction, conclusion, or summary Summary is missing many important facts, or has facts presented out of order Summary has some important facts missing, or has  facts presented out of order All appropriate facts presented in complete sentences, in logical order and clearly expressed  

 

Conclusion:

The Olympic Games represent a microcosm of the 20th century because most of the major political and social movements since 1896 have influenced various aspects of the Games.  By studying Olympic athletes, you have gained a more personal insight into the circumstances and events of the last 100 years.  You have also seen examples of idealism, success, failure, and courage in action.  The Olympic motto of "Citius, Altius, Fortius" challenges athletes to reach faster, higher, and stronger.  Your challenge is to be inspired by what you have learned and to never be satisfied with anything less than your personal best.