USF's WebQuest 

Title: Quest for the Gold: An Olympics Webquest       

Author: Bill Warnken                

Date:18 April 2005

Dear Colleague: 

     This unit has been created as a 20th century review.  The Olympic Games can be viewed as a microcosm of that era because they are truly one event that brings the world together in celebration. Yet the Games have been influenced by the great social, political, and economic changes of the past century.  Students will explore the circumstances and individuals associated with the Summer and Winter Olympics.  They should be inspired and fascinated by the incredible stories of accomplishment, courage, determination, and failure of athletes around the world.

Teacher's Page

Unit Summary Teacher's Resources Day 1 Lesson Day 2 Lesson
Day 3 Lesson Day 4 Lesson Day 5 Lesson Day 6 Lesson
Day 7 Lesson Conclusion Student's Web Quest  

                  

Unit Summary:   To learn more about history through the perspective of athletes and sport

Goals/Objectives:                                                              

1. Students will be able to identify relevant information about the ancient & modern Olympic Games.
2. Students will be able to discuss symbolism associated with the modern Olympic movement.
3. Students will analyze and evaluate topics associated with the Olympic movement, including
    racism, terrorism, cheating, communism, and idealism.



 

NCSS Theme:

V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

Days: 7 (55 minute classes)

You may want to include a weekend between lesson 5 & 6 to allow students to work on their project.

Content: A study of 20th century history and its impact on the Olympic Games.

Lesson 1: Formulate ideas about Olympic ideals & power point presentation on Ancient Olympics.                                                                                       
Lesson 2: Formulate ideas about Olympic ideals & lecture on Modern Olympic Movement                                                                                                   
Lesson 3: Discuss Olympic symbolism & begin WebQuest by dividing teams, assigning jobs, and reviewing expectations.                                                      
Lesson 4: WebQuest Research & Discussion                                                                                                                                                                       
Lesson 5: WebQuest Research & Discussion                                                                                                                                                                        
Lesson 6: WebQuest Presentations                                                                                                                                                                                        

Lesson 7: WebQuest Presentations

Methods:

This unit will employ teacher directed activities including a brainstorming discussion and lecture.  This unit will also employ technology based instruction including a power point presentation and the group WebQuest activity.

 

WebQuest  Summary: To create a Hall of Fame & Museum of Olympic history.

Goals/Objectives: To create opportunities to discuss relevant issues on racism, cheating, communism, terrorism, and working hard to do your best.

1. Students will analyze and evaluate topics associated with the Olympic movement, including
    racism, terrorism, cheating, communism, and idealism.

 
Example #1 Students could debate usefulness of boycotts                                                                                                                                                      
1936 Should the US boycott Nazi Olympics in Berlin because of civil rights issues of German Jews?                                                                                        
1968 Should black athletes boycott Mexico Olympics because of civil rights issues in United States?                                                                                        
1976 Should African nations boycott Montreal Olympics because of Apartheid policies?                                                                                                             

1980 Should the United States boycott Moscow Olympics because of Soviet invasion of Afghanistan?

 
Example #2 Students could debate the role of politics in the Games                                                                                                                                        
1924 Should the Germans have been invited to the Olympics?                                                                                                                                                 
1936 Were the Olympics successful in portraying the Nazi's in a positive way?                                                                                                                          
1956 Can politics be removed from the Olympics? Hungary vs. Russia Water Polo                                                                                                                   
1968 Should American athletes be expelled from the Games for making a political statement?                                                                                                   
1972 What could terrorists hope to accomplish by destroying the friendly spirit of the Games?                                                                                                 
1972 What could terrorists hope to accomplish by destroying the friendly spirit of the Games?                                                                                                 
1972 Should nations negotiate with terrorists?                                                                                                                                                                          

1980 What impact did the Miracle on Ice have on the United States?

 
Example #3 Students could examine the roles of the athletes                                                                                                                                                           
Should the Olympics allow professional athletes to compete?                                                                                                                                                   
How did communist nations use their athletes?                                                                                                                                                                           
Did non-communist nations use their athletes?                                                                                                                                                                             
Do high profile athletes have a responsibility to help in the community?                                                                                                                                      
How should the issue of steroids and other performance enhancing drugs be handled?                                                                                                          

Students can debate the issues of ethics and integrity.

Days: 4 (55 minute classes)

You may want to include a weekend between WebQuest days 3 & 4 to allow students time to work on their project.

Content: Individual stories and world circumstances.

            Students will examine the modern Olympic movement by decades from its inception to the present.  Their attention will be focused on the Games, individual athletes, and world events.  Students should be making comparisons between the ideals of the Games and the reality of political and social circumstances.  In the end, students should have made some value judgments on controversial topics, debated the merits (or lack thereof) of individual accomplishments, and been inspired by the amazing courage and determination of some special athletes.

Methods: Creating monuments to reflect the best and worst of the Olympics        

Teachers Resources

Unit Information:
    

Background Resources

Teacher Background Resources
Ancient Olympic Games          http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Olympics

Ancient Olympic Games          http://www.museum.upenn.edu/new/olympics/olympicintro.shtml

Pierre de Coubertin                  http://www.coubertin.ch
Modern Games                         http://history1900s.about.com/library/weekly/aa08100a.htm
Timeline                                     http://www.youth.net/olympic/timeline.events.html
Symbolism                                http://www.infoplease.com/spot/olympicsceremonies.html
                                      http://www.aafla.org/6oic/primer_frmst.htm
Olympic Revival                      http://sunsite.tus.ac.jp/olympics/revival/rebirth.html
 

Teacher WebQuest Resources
Int'l Olympic Committee                     http://www.olympic.org/
Int'l Society of Olympic Historians  http://www.isoh.org/index.html
 

 Student Resources
Int'l Olympic Committee        http://www.olympic.org/
Modern Games                       http://www.kiat.net/olympics/history/  
                                                  http://www.cbc.ca/olympics/ 
                                     http://sunsite.tus.ac.jp/olympics/revival/rebirth.html
                                     http://history1900s.about.com/library/weekly/aa08100a.htm


Unit Lesson Sequence
 


Day 1
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Optional Video Clip Attention Getter Find an inspiring Olympic video clip to show the students.  This could be from a movie like "Miracle", "Cool Runnings", or "Chariots of Fire" or could be from a documentary focusing on Jim Thorpe, Jesse Owens, Wilma Rudolph, etc.  
     
Teacher led discussion Students will formulate their ideas about Olympic "ideals."  These questions are taken from the WebQuest.  Each group answers the same questions about the purpose, ideals, competitive nature, qualifications, etc. of the Games. WebQuest Questions
     
Ancient Games PowerPoint Background on the Ancient Greek Games Power Point
     

 

Day 2
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Optional Video Clip Attention Getter Find an inspiring Olympic video clip to show the students.  This could be from a movie like "Miracle", "Cool Runnings", or "Chariots of Fire" or could be from a documentary focusing on Jim Thorpe, Jesse Owens, Wilma Rudolph, etc.  
     
Olympic Quote Attention Getter Finish questions that you didn't get to yesterday.

Students will formulate their ideas about Olympic "ideals."  These questions are taken from the WebQuest.  Each group answers the same questions about the purpose, ideals, competitive nature, qualifications, etc. of the Games.

WebQuest Questions
     
Coubertin lecture Background of the Modern Games.  Information can be found at the link to the right Olympic Revival
     

 

Day 3
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Symbolism Wksht Flag, Motto, Oath -- Information can be found at the link to the right Olympic Symbols
     
Webquest Introduction to Olympic WebQuest.  The teacher should divide students into groups, allocate jobs, and review expectations.   
     

 

Day 4   
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
WebQuest Research Students should research the WebQuest links in a computer lab.  The teacher should monitor the work and offer assistance as necessary.  Allow for some group discussion time for students to develop their Olympic era  theme and which examples to use for their museum. Data Sheets
     

 

Day 5   
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
WebQuest Students should research the WebQuest links in a computer lab.  The teacher should monitor the work and offer assistance as necessary.  Allow for some group discussion time for students to develop their Olympic era  theme and which examples to use for their museum. Data Sheets
     
WebQuest Homework Students should formulate their ideas for an exhibit and build it over a weekend  
     

 

Day 6
Lesson Plan Outline

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Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Presentations Student groups will present their Olympic Hall of Fame and Museum exhibits.   
     

 

Day 7
Lesson Plan Outline

 Back to Top

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Presentations Student groups will present their Olympic Hall of Fame and Museum exhibits.   
     

 

Conclusion:  During this lesson, students should have critically examined historical issues associated with the Olympics.  These topics could include amateurism and illegal drug use by athletes, racism in Nazi Germany and the United States, communism's role in Eastern Europe and Cuba, and commercialism's effect on the Olympics.  Students should also have been exposed to inspiring and courageous stories of hard working athletes, including women, minorities, and the handicapped.

 

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