USF's WebQuest 

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Unit Summary Teacher's Resources Day 1 Lesson Day 2 Lesson
Day 3 Lesson Day 4 Lesson Day 5 Lesson Day 6 Lesson
Day 7 Lesson Conclusion Student's Web Quest  

WebQuest Title:  The First Political Parties 

Dear Colleague: 

This unit is designed to introduce students to the emergence of political parties in the United States.  Students will be introduced to the various beliefs of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists with respect to the ratification of the U.S. Constitution and leading to the 1796 Presidential election. 

Author:  Linda Bath          

Date:  April 8, 2006           

Unit Summary:
Goals/Objectives: 

  1. Students will be familiar with the individuals who play a key role in the Constitutional debate.
  2. Students will understand the beliefs of the Federalists and Anti-Federalist, including who supported which party and why they supported it.
  3. Students will be introduced to the manner in which a president was elected to office in 1796.

Days: 

Four days

Content:

The unit will draw upon prior knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, including its purpose and meaning to the newly established country.  Students will then be introduced to the debate over the constitution, development of political parties, and key players in the election of 1796. 
   

Methods:

In this unit the class will participate in cooperative learning, a webquest activity, discussion, and lecture using a power point.

WebQuest  Summary:
Goals/Objectives:

  1. Students will research the presidential nominees for the 1796 election.
  2. Students will further research the beliefs of the Federalist and Anti-Federalist (Democratic Republican) parties.
  3. Students will put together their knowledge gained to campaign for one of the nominees.

Days: 

Three days

Content:

Students will continue to learn about the different beliefs held by those who favor and those who were against the ratification of the Constitution, eventually choosing their preferred presidential nominee, backing up their choice with facts that they have learned throughout the unit.  Students will create a campaign poster with an explanation as to why others should vote for their candidate, referencing the beliefs held by the nomineeís party and the parties opinions about the Constitution.

Methods:       

Students will research while working cooperatively to come to a decision about who they will campaign for as the nationís second president. They will then be required to create a poster and oral presentation to be given to the class.

   

Teachers Resources

Unit Information:
    

Background Resources

Web-based Subject Matter Content
Go to http://www.usconstitution.net/constconart.html for an easy to follow comparison of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.

 

The Federalist Papers can be found at http://thomas.loc.gov/home/histdox/fedpapers.html for reference.
 
Federalist and Anti-Federalist Contentions from http://www.georgetown.edu/faculty/bassr/heath/syllabuild/iguide/federal.html  can assist in finding further information regarding the contributors and background of the Federalist papers and contributing individuals.
 

Web Pedagogy Content
The Integration of Computer Technology into the Curriculum found at http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/lausd/resources/integration/ can assist teachers with computer programs and terminology that may be unfamiliar.
 
The Scholastic site, http://teacher.scholastic.com/professional/teachtech/techsetup.htm, presents information on how to use computers in the classroom depending on the number of computers that you have available.
 

 Other Resources
An article from the journal Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education can be accessed at http://www.editlib.org/index.cfm/files/paper_6042.pdf?fuseaction=Reader.DownloadFullText&paper_id=6042.  This paper provides insight into the use of technology in schools and the potential problems that you may encounter.  This site also explains the usefulness of webquests in the classroom.
 


Unit Lesson Sequence
 


Day 1    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work / Attention Getter Journal entry:  Analyze the political cartoon.  Who do the characters represent?  What is the cartoon representing?  Did the author do a good job sending the desired message to the readers, why or why not?

This will then be discussed as a class as a preview of one of the options students have during their presentation to come.

Cartoon
     
Review Activity Students will review the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.  Using the provided handout and their textbook they will compare the two documents. Comparison handout

Articles of Confederation

Constitution

     
Debriefing The comparison handout will be discussed as a class.  It is important that all students understand the differences present between the two documents in order to successfully complete the webquest.  

 


Day 2    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work / Attention Getter Journal entry:  Write a paragraph response to the following question.  Do you believe it is necessary to have a document like the Constitution?  What purpose does it serve and is it important, why or why not?

Responses will be discussed as a class

 
     
Reading Assignment Tensions build among members of government and a division among individuals based on political beliefs is becoming evident. Excerpt from A Concise History of America and its People
     
Check for Understanding / Group Work Students will be assigned to groups, which will be their permanent groups throughout the unit.  In this group the students will discuss a set of questions about the previous reading and record their answers. Questions
     
Debriefing Any student questions will be addressed, and responses to the discussion questions will be given by students.  

Day 3    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work / Attention Getter Journal Entry:  Do you believe that something like the Federalist Papers would have such an impact on our country today?  Why or why not?  
     
Lecture Election of 1796 and the key players will be presented.  Students will become familiar with the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, including their basic beliefs and the characteristics of their supporters.  Power Point presentation
     
Writing Assignment:  RAFT Role:  Citizen of the United States in the year 1796

Audience: Government Leaders

Format:  Letter (Written formally, after all, you are addressing some of the most influential individuals in the United States)

Topic:  Election Campaigns (What in your opinion is the best way for the candidates to campaign.  When writing, remember that they must not only persuade individuals to vote for them, but also convince people not to vote for their competitor)

 
     

Day 4    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work Journal entry:  How do you think presidential campaigning was done in 1796? Do you believe the methods used would be similar to those today?  Why or why not?  
     
Group Discussion Students will join their groups assigned on day 2 and discuss the various ideas presented in the RAFT from the previous day.  The groups will discuss the campaigning options in 1796 and come to an agreement as to which methods they believe would be the most effective.   
     
Preview and expectations for webquest activity After the students have discussed their options, the will be assigned roles within their groups.  These roles will be kept during the entire webquest activity and presentation.

The expectations for the webquest, along with the rubric will be discussed

Roles

Rubric

     
Expectation for computer use Students will be given a review on the computer lab rules and procedures because these may differ greatly from the normal classroom policies. 

Any questions that the students may have prior to entering the computer lab and beginning work on the webquest will be addressed.

 

Day 5    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work Address any final questions before beginning the webquest activity  
     
Content Webquest Student webquest

Day 6    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work Check with your group to see what information is still needed.  Remember you must be finished with the webquest by the beginning of class tomorrow, including all necessary material for your presentation.  You will not have any more computer time to work during class!  
     
Content Continue webquest Student webquest

Day 7    Back to Top
 

Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Bell Work Get with your group and put any final touches on your presentation.  Be sure that you have incorporated all aspects of the rubric into your final product.  You have 10 minutes to work. Rubric
     
Presentations Students will present their final product to the class

Students will then be given evaluation forms to grade the other members of their group to be completed and handed in

Peer Evaluation
     
Lecture (To be continued the following class if needed) What really happened?  The outcome of the election. Power Point presentation

 

Students WebQuest

Go to Students Section (Give this address to your students)

Credits/References:  Linda Bath, MAT program, University of South Florida, Tampa

       

 

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