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WebQuest Title:  The Lewis and Clark Expedition
Author:  Evan Schroeder
Date: April 1, 2003
Dear Colleague:

The purpose of this WebQuest is to assist you in your teaching of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.  It is designed as a brief unit that can be used as a supplement to the chapter in your textbook on expansion and the growth of America.  If you have questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact me.  This information can be found on the Teacher's Page of the WebQuest.  It is my hope that you will find this to be a valuable resource in your classroom.

Unit Summary:

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Goals/Objectives:

1.

Students will  know the importance of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark Expedition in American history, particularly, the impact of the purchase and how it contributed to the growth of the new nation.

2.

Students will know more about those who were most influential during this time period.

3.

Students will have a clear understanding of the trails the explorers followed, what they encountered on their journey, and how its completion forever changed the United States.
Days:
4 (45 minute periods)
Content:
The focus of this unit will include a variety of maps detailing the trails that were followed, a study of the journals of Lewis and Clark, and the work that went into making the expedition a success.
   
 Methods:  
A variety will be used, including documentaries of the expedition, internet research conducted to complete assignments and papers, worksheets, transparencies, a PowerPoint presentation to accompany the lectures, and a comprehensive exam after the completion of the unit.
WebQuest  Summary:  
Goals/Objectives:

1.

Students will understand the enormous undertaking that went into making the exploration across this new territory a success.

2.

Students will see how difficult the decision behind the Louisiana Purchase was for President Jefferson, who went against his belief that the Constitution should be followed exactly as it was written, in order to make the purchase.
Days:
2 days (60 minute period)
Content:
The content for the WebQuest will largely deal with the expedition itself and how it was accomplished.  More detailed information about the journey and the Louisiana Purchase will be covered in the unit.
   
 Methods:  
Students will utilize the internet to conduct their research as they complete the assignments.  Students will also analyze primary source documents as part of their assignment.

 

     Teachers Resources

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Unit Information:
    

Background Resources

Teacher Background Resources:
Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery (www.pbs.org/lewisandclark/).  This website provides biographies of Lewis and Clark as well others who were involved in the Corps of Discovery.  It also gives information on the Indian tribes already on the land at the time of the expedition and allows visitors to pretend that they are leading the expedition.

Discovering Lewis and Clark (www.lewis-clark.org).  Contains a nineteen-part synopsis of the expedition by historian Harry Fritz, illustrated with selections from the journals of the expedition, photographs, maps, animated graphics, moving pictures, and sound files.  Clicking on any still image or highlighted word will lead you to another level of insight into the significance of the Lewis and Clark expedition in American history, and in contemporary life.

Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation (www.lewisandclark.org).  This website contains an expedition timeline and maps as well as excerpts from the journals of Lewis and Clark.  Also contains thoughts about the expedition from several expert historians.  Provides biographical information about the members of the Corps of Discovery, from the most famous to the virtually unknown.  Includes a map labeled with their outbound and inbound routes.

Lewis and Clarkís Historic Trail (www.lewisclark.net).  This website provides historical maps created by Clark, a pre-expedition map, and a map showing the route taken by the Corps of Discovery to the Pacific.  A Timeline of the Trip gives an easy-to-follow overview of the expedition, from its inception to the later death of William Clark.

Lewis and Clark Internet Archive (www.lcarchive.org).  This website provides the Journals as a searchable, chronological compilation of excerpts from the journals of seven members of the Corps of Discovery, including Lewis and Clark. They span March 3, 1804, to September 26, 1806.  Also provides several distinct maps of the journey along with annotations.

WebQuest Teacher Resources:

(www.monticello.org/jefferson/lewisandclark/).  This website provides an enormous amount of information related to the journey.  Explains details on the origins of the expedition, preparation for the expedition, and an expedition timeline.  Also gives insight into the exhibition currently running at Jeffersonís home.

Lewis and Clark Project (www.lewisandclarkeducationcenter.com).  This website explores Jefferson's long-time interest in exploration.  It also lists important events that led up to Jefferson's prompting of the Expedition, including his support of previous attempts to explore the West.

Lewis and Clark in North Dakota (www.ndlewisandclark.com).  This website shows how Jefferson's membership in the premier American intellectual society influenced the Expedition.  It also provides a background on Jefferson's relationship with American Indians apart from Lewis and Clark.

National Geographic: Lewis and Clark (www.nationalgeographic.com/lewisandclark/).  This website provides a full interactive journey log as well as expedition records including discoveries and supplies used.  It also provides a background on Jefferson's relationship with American Indians apart from Lewis and Clark.  It also includes a transcription of Jefferson's secret request to the United States Congress for funds for the Expedition.

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trr001.html).  This website contains maps with detailed information of much of the Lewis and Clarkís Track. Among the Library's original maps documenting the expedition (1803-06) of Lewis and Clark are published maps issued with the final reports of the expedition, as well as planning maps and those actually carried with them.

Student Background Resources:
Following the Voyage of Discovery: Lewis and Clark (www.lewisandclark.com).  This website provides a listing of frequently asked questions about Lewis and Clark and the expedition.  It is an excellent place for students to gain background information before beginning a research project on the explorers.  It also has a link to allow students to ask their questions about the journey.
Time Magazine: Lewis and Clark Bicentennial (www.time.com/time/2002/lewis_clark).  This website, which accompanies a Time Magazine Commemorative Issue, acts as a supplement to an extensive study marking the 200th anniversary.  It has a variety of resources for students to utilize, particularly a Lewis and Clark Web Guide which gives a listing of Time's picks of the most helpful books, journals and links featuring Lewis & Clark.
Lewis and Clark: Circa 1803 (www.lewisandclark1803.com).  This website puts the expedition into a historical and political context, investigating popular misconceptions of the West, as well as Jeffersonís motivations for exploring it.  It gives students a chance to look at the expedition from a political point of view, something the other websites donít take into consideration.

Biography of Thomas Jefferson (www.whitehouse.gov).  In addition to having knowledge about the explorers themselves, it is also important for students to have an understanding of Jefferson, not just as president, but also his ideologies, and how they played out during his presidency.  Jeffersonís vision for America was always that of a nation of farmers.  This was the main reason behind the Louisiana Purchase.

Teaching With Documents Lesson Plan: The Lewis and Clark Expedition (www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/lewis_and_clark/lewis_and_clark.html)             This website provides a good, but brief, background on the expedition.  It also contains a variety of letters of correspondence between President Jefferson and Congress, the explorers, and other important members of the government at the time.  One very interesting letter is one from President Jefferson to James Madison, secretary of state, announcing that Louisiana was purchased from France.  Gives students a chance to read some of the history about this important journey.
WebQuest Student Resources:
Lewis and Clark in North Dakota (www.ndlewisandclark.com/frames.html).  This website offers a variety of sections to help students with their study.  In addition to an excellent overview, there are links for profiles, chronologies, sites and side trips, maps, and trivia and facts.  It also contains a sample webquest of the Lewis and Clark expedition to aid them in the completion of their webquest.
Lewis and Clark Timeline (www.lewisclark.net/timeline/index.html).  To give students an idea of the length of time that went into the preparation and completion of the expedition, I feel that this would be an appropriate site for them to become familiar with while working on the webquest.  It is an excellent way to break down the trip into an historical context.  It details the expedition from the births of Lewis and Clark until their deaths.
(www.lib.virginia.edu/speccol/exhibits/lewis_clark/index.html).  This website provides detailed maps of the expedition from the beginning to the end.  It also provides individual routes of all the trails and indicated where and through what states the trails crossed.  This website will allow students to put into perspective the enormous distance traveled by the Corps of Discovery in order to map out this new territory.
(www.bonniebutterfield.com/NativeAmericans.html).  This website will give students a good biography and overview about the life of Sacagawea and her crucial role in the expedition.  It also answers to very important questions: (1) Why did Sacagawea, a Shoshone Indian, help Lewis and Clarkís Expedition find a passageway through her own peopleís unexplored Northwest territory, while knowingly assisting Whites in their invasion of Indian Sacred lands? (2) Did Sacagawea turn her back on the Shoshone Tribe of her birth, and die in a South Dakota Trading Post run by Whites, or did she live to an old age among her Shoshone Peoples in Wyoming as they contend?  From the perspective of a Native American these are two major questions that white historians have failed to answer clearly.
 
Louisiana Purchase 2003 (www.louisianapurchase2003.com/index.html).  This website offers a behind-the-scenes look at the Louisiana Purchase.  It contains information about the purchase itself, those who were involved, and President Jeffersonís letters and addresses regarding the purchase.  It also contains numerous links about museums, attractions, and events celebrating the 200th anniversary of the purchase.

 Other Resources
Video - "Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery"
 
Student Activity Sheets
 
A reproducible map of the United States

 

Unit Lesson Sequence
 


Day 1    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lecture

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

PowerPoint Presentation and Class Website
Class Discussion and Independent Work Background information.  Ask them what they would do to prepare for such a journey.  Compare the idea of exploring a completely foreign area today to what Lewis and Clark faced.  Show a video clip of the movie in which John Allen compares the journey of Lewis and Clark to a journey to the moon. Video excerpt- "Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery."  Activity Sheet Section 1

 

Sharing Students will share their thoughts about the expedition as well as their responses to Section 1 of the Activity Sheet.  
Homework Students will complete 2 handouts about the expedition and how it related to expansion.  

Day 2    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lecture

Life and Geography at the Time of the Expedition

Internet research, Video excerpt, and Class Website
Class Discussion and Independent Work Students will read the "Circa 1803" handout from the website to see what information the expedition (and the United States in general) had at the time that the Corps of Discovery embarked on their journey. Section 2 of the Activity Sheet
Sharing Students will share thoughts from the discussion describe the lifestyle, knowledge of geography, and rumors that abounded regarding the West.  
Homework Students will complete Section 3 of the Activity Sheet and compare a pre-expedition map to a modern map and answer a series of questions. Section 3 of the Activity Sheet and 2 maps

Day 3    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lecture

The Corps of Discovery Route

Video excerpt and Class Website
Class Discussion and Independent Work Students will look at "The Route of the Corps of Discovery" to find out where the expedition actually went.  They will trace the journey on their own copy of the map of the United States provided. Handouts and map of the United States
Homework Students will complete Section 4 of the Activity Sheet and compare the route maps they have drawn to a modern map of the United States.  This will allow them to base their understanding of the Lewis and Clark expedition on their own geographical knowledge of this country. Section 4 of the Activity Sheet and additional handout

Day 4    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lecture Place Names and Unit Wrap-Up Complete the video and PowerPoint Unit Review
Class Discussion and Independent Work Students will look at the modern United States map and, in the areas where Lewis and Clark passed through, find names that Lewis and Clark gave to the places they went.  They should find the places mentioned in the journal excerpts provided and should also locate other towns, rivers, or landmarks that are clearly names after the expedition. Journal excerpts, map of the United States, and all Activity sheets completed so far.
Homework Have students label the above features on their maps and trace them with a red pencil to show that they were named by the Corps of Discovery.  As a unit closure activity, have students write a sample journal entry as if they were a member of the expedition.  The journal entry should discuss what they expect to find, what they fear, what they will miss, and where they plan to go.   

Day 5    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lewis and Clark WebQuest Background information on the purposes and uses of WebQuests.  Parts I (Introduction),  II (Task), and III (Resources) of the WebQuest will be completed and/or discussed in class and a class discussion will follow.  Students will turn in their individual assignments at the end of each day. Computer and Internet access
     

Day 6    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Lewis and Clark Webquest Parts IV (Conclusion), and V (Evaluation) of the WebQuest will be completed and a class discussion will follow.  The final two sections will be turned in at the end of class.  Computer and Internet access
WebQuest Wrap-Up A final class discussion will complete the unit and the WebQuest.  Students will be given an opportunity to provide feedback on the WebQuest and whether or not they felt it was an effective tool.  
Homework Study for the Unit Test.  Distribute study guides.  

Day 7    Back to Top
 

Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
 

Unit Test on the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Students will turn in their study guides
     
     
     
     
     
     

Day    Back to Top
 

Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

Conclusion:       Back to Top

Credits/References:

http://school.discovery.com/

http://www.pbs.org/


 

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