Brian Ayres' WebQuest 

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Unit Summary Teacher's Resources Day 1 Lesson Day 2 Lesson
Day 3 Lesson Day 4 Lesson Day 5 Lesson Day 6 Lesson
Day 7 Lesson   Conclusion Student's Web Quest

WebQuest Title:  Nation Building     

Author:  Brian Ayres            

Date:  March 18, 2003

Dear Colleague: 

This unit is designed to introduce students the complexities of rebuilding nations after war.  The conflicts the unit will focus on will include The Marshall Plan after World War II; the war in Kosovo and Afghanistan; and the impending conflict with Iraq.  The first three lessons are introductions to each post-war rebuilding project with PowerPoint presentation and subsequent activity.  The last lesson of the unit is a Nation Building Webquest which involves students using the internet to investigate four major considerations a country must think about in the process of rebuilding a nation it has invaded and conquered.  The unit will conclude with student presentations of their webquest assignment.        

Unit Summary:

Goals/Objectives: 

1. Students will grasp the recent history of the efforts by the United States to rebuild nations after they were dismantled from war (either World or Civil), including Japan and Europe after WWII, Yugoslavia from the 1990s and Afghanistan of today.

2. Students will learn the geography and culture of these lands and how both often clash with the goals of nation-building.

3. Students will do a hypothetical webquest on how they might go about rebuilding Iraq if the forthcoming U.S.-led invasion ousts Saddam Husseinís totalitarian regime.

Days:

7 Days (90 minute blocks)

Content: 

The content for this will focus on the difficulties behind nation-building and will include two major U.S. nation-building accords in the 20th and 21 centuries: The Marshall Plan after WWII and the current rebuilding in Afghanistan . Geography lessons will show how important it is to be sensitive to cultures when discussing how to rebuild landscapes ruined after war. Also, discussions on different governments, religions and economic systems in given regions of the world will be necessary for students before they are trying to piece together their nation-building webquest. However, the U.S.-Iraq situation will be the bulk of the unit

Methods:

Within this unit, lecture will be the predominant mean leading up to the webquest. Most lectures will be feedback and think/write/discuss. It is important to give students basic information but then for them to use it immediately in discussion groups or written assignments. Activities will include group work prioritizing types of government, religious and economic systems and social issues. Assignments will include read and respond articles for homework.

Webquest  Summary:

Goals/Objectives:

    1. Students will get hands on experience trying to do the delicate task of rebuilding a nation.

    2. Students will also present proposals to the class, providing them with experience of public speaking.

Days:

2.5 Days (90-minute blocks)

Content:

The content of the webquest  includes a variety of websites on the historical examples of how the United States handled the task in the past. Articles on the pros and cons of one nation rebuilding another will also be included. Other sites will include history and geographical makeup of Iraq for use with the various assignments.

Methods:

The first aspect of the webquest will see four-man teams break up to tackle the four key areas of rebuilding: The economic advisor will gather information on the country's current economic system and any changes that might be made; the political advisor will decide the best form of government given the nationís history; the geographic/infrastructure advisor will develop a sound plan on how to redirect refugees and rebuild broken cities; and the religious/social advisor will tackle what if any religious and social changes should be made. The second stage will be the presentations of these plans to the president in a Cabinet-style setting.

 

Teachers Resources

Unit Information: These resources provide helpful information on the process and history of nation building.
    

Background Resources

Teacher Background Resources

1. Computers in the Classroom -- http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/lausd/resources/integration/

2. Integrating the Internet into your Curriculum -- http://pd.l2l.org/linktuts/inteweb.htm

3. ìBuilding Peaceî Essays -- http://www.ssrc.org/sept11/essays/teaching_resource/tr_intro.htm
4. Nation-building.org -- http://www.nation-building.com/default.HTM
5.  CNN.com -- http://www.cnn.com/

Webquest Teacher Resources

6. History/Social Studies for K-12 Teachers -- http://my.execpc.com/~dboals/boals.html
7. Geography Classroom -- http://home.att.net/~geographyclassroom/home.html
8. The Webquest Page -- http://www.lgusd.k12.ca.us/webquests3.html 
9. Nation Building lesson plan -- http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20011022monday.html 

10. Rubistar -- http://rubistar.4teachers.org/

Student Background Resources

 11. ìBuilding and Breaking Nationsî ñ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/july-dec02/nations.html
 12. ìA New Marshall Planî -- http://www.worldwatch.org/alerts/011009.html
 13. ìJapan Under American Occupationî -- http://www.empereur.com/DOC/Japan_occup.html
 14. The United Nations -- http://www.un.org/english/
15. ìNation-building in Bosniaî -- http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/military/etc/peace.html

Webquest Student Resources

16. U.S. State Department Iraq Update -- http://usinfo.state.gov/regional/nea/iraq/
17. The Marshall Plan -- http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/marshall/
18. Middle East Network Information Center -- http://menic.utexas.edu/menic/
19. World Governments -- http://www.adminet.com/world/gov/
20. Internet research tips -- http://web2010.brevard.cc.fl.us/library/InternetResearchTips.pdf


Unit Lesson Sequence
 


Day 1    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Attention Getter (10 minutes) To personalize the idea of war, students will be asked to write out the biggest fight they have ever been in and the ramifications that resulted. Did you a friend? a parent? How did you make amends of the situation? Teacher will ask for about five student volunteers.  None
Read and discuss letter 

(15 minutes)

Students will read this letter from a WWII soldier to understand just what war leaves for the occupants of the country. They will answer this question, "What is harder: fighting the battles or cleaning up the mess?"  WWII Letter
Lecture (30 minutes) Students will take notes from a PowerPoint presentation on The Marshall Plan, which helped rebuild Western Europe after WWII.  Marshall Plan PowerPoint
Video (15 minutes) "Seeing the Victory Through" -- the video details the Marshall Plan and how it made the rebuilding of Europe possible after WWII.  Video Transcript
Assignment (20 minutes) In class and for homework, students will work on essay assignment at end of PowerPoint: Explain whether it was worth it for the U.S. to go ahead with The Marshall Plan and what might have happened had we let Europe go at it alone.
 Marshall's Harvard speech transcript

 


Day 2    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline -- Day 2 lesson is modified from The New York Times Learning Network

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Attention Getter (10 minutes) To personalize the idea of nation-building, students will be asked to write down 10 things that make the United States a "nation." Teacher will compile list on board and define each key aspect.  None
Read and discuss article    (30 minutes) Students will read silently the article, "After the War, rebuild a nation if it's a Nation" and complete the assigned questions. (See question handout)  "... If It's a Nation."

Question handout

Lecture (15 minutes) Provide a brief overview of the six recent conflicts the article mentioned that the United States has found itself trying to solve. Notes will include basic information on geography and basis for conflict, taken from the CIA World Factbook. Students will be asked to research the conflict in more detail.  PowerPoint lecture

Transparency maps of each country

Group activity (35 minutes and into Day 3) In five groups, students will research the history of U.S. involvement in the six countries described in the PowerPoint lecture. They will answer specific questions from a handout and put these into graphic organizer form on a large poster board. Students will then be expected to present to the class their findings. Group questions sheet

Concept map organizer

Markers, poster boards, books, Internet access, atlases.


Day 3    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Group Activity (15 minutes)  Allow students this time to finish up graphic organizers. Students should have chosen the recorder for the posters and two presenters. Same as above.
Presentations (30 minutes) Allow individual group approximately five minutes to present the information they compiled on their organizer. Other groups should copy this information down for use on later quiz

Watch to time presentations

 Rubric for presentations on worksheet.

 

  Reading and Discussion (30 minutes) Students will read the pair of articles. One is why we should invade Iraq and the other is on why we shouldnít invade. Each individual will be asked to read both articles, write five arguments for and five arguments against and then take a position for him or herself

 Why We Should Invade.

 Why We Shouldnít Invade

 

 Homework assignment (15 minutes) Write a 1-page or 500-word position paper on why we should or should not invade Iraq . Positions must include how the future of Iraq will be shaped by your decision. Complete outline before leaving class.  

Day 4    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Group debate (15 minutes) Each side (pro and con invasion) will select one member for a short 5-10 minute debate on invasion. Five points extra credit will be given to the side the teacher feels wins. Three points to the side that doesnít.  
Lecture (15 minutes) Overview of Webquest assignment. This will contain a quick lesson in using webquests. An overview of what is a webquest will be given based on the web site listed above titled The Webquest Page. TEACHER will assign four-person groups for the webquest on the next day. Lecture notes

 Individual web quest tasks

(1 hour)

 

Students will go to the computer lab and work individually on their tasks for their web quests.  This should take no more than 1 hour. Teacher needs to keep students aware of the time and help any person who needs it. Computer access

Day 5    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Group work (90 minutes) Students will have the whole period to compile the information obtained and makes decisions based on the information. Students will assign persons who will write a summary of the actions taken, two people who will bind the information and another who will make the presentation in front of the class in two days. Poster board, markers, scissors will be needed. Computer access to type up reports.

Day 6    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Video (60 minutes) CNN Presents: Iraq Five Questions. This video is available through the media center. It provides a detailed look at the five key questions surrounding the events between the United States and Iraq , including some history of Iraq and what will happen after invasion. VCR. Students will need pen and paper to take notes. They will turn in 1 page (front and back) of notes.
Writing assignment            (30 minutes) Students will produce a 100-150 letter to the editor to the magazine or newspaper of their choice, conveying their feelings on how the Iraq-U.S. situation has affected their high school experience. Pens and papers.

Day 7    Back to Top
Lesson Plan Outline

Method (Attention Getter, Lecture, Callout Group, etc)

Content/Key Ideas/Concepts/Facts
 

Materials
(Transparencies, audio, handouts, etc)
Presentations (10 minutes per group; 8 groups = 32 students) Students will present their reports on how to best rebuild Iraq after the war with the United States and its allies. Grading rubrics to score presentations

 

Conclusion:

After the class has finished with this unit the students will have an understanding the process and the decisions that go into not only getting involved militarily with another country but the hard work it takes to rebuild a nation following war. This lesson also provides a solid geographical background of Iraq and other countries the United States has intervened with throughout the past 50 years.

Credits/References: Mixed throughout the lesson.


 

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