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STANDARD 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

Overview

One of the most common problems in helping students to become thoughtful readers of historical narrative is the compulsion students feel to find the one right answer, the one essential fact, the one authoritative interpretation. "Am I on the right track?" "Is this what you want?" they ask. Or, worse yet, they rush to closure, reporting back as self-evident truths the facts or conclusions presented in the document or text.

These problems are deeply rooted in the conventional ways in which textbooks have presented history: a succession of facts marching straight to a settled outcome. To overcome these problems requires the use of more than a single source: of history books other than textbooks and of a rich variety of historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts, and interpretations or perspectives on the past.

Students need to realize that historians may differ on the facts they incorporate in the development of their narratives and disagree as well on how those facts are to be interpreted. Thus, "history" is usually taken to mean what happened in the past; but written history is a dialogue among historians, not only about what happened but about why and how events unfolded. The study of history is not only remembering answers. It requires following and evaluating arguments and arriving at usable, even if tentative, conclusions based on the available evidence.

To engage in historical analysis and interpretation students must draw upon their skills of historical comprehension. In fact, there is no sharp line separating the two categories. Certain of the skills involved in comprehension overlap the skills involved in analysis and are essential to it. For example, identifying the author or source of a historical document or narrative and assessing its credibility (comprehension) is prerequisite to comparing competing historical narratives (analysis). Analysis builds upon the skills of comprehension; it obliges the student to assess the evidence on which the historian has drawn and determine the soundness of interpretations created from that evidence. It goes without saying that in acquiring these analytical skills students must develop the ability to differentiate between expressions of opinion, no matter how passionately delivered, and informed hypotheses grounded in historical evidence.  

 Well-written historical narrative has the power to promote students' analysis of historical causality--of how change occurs in society, of how human intentions matter, and how ends are influenced by the means of carrying them out, in what has been called the tangle of process and outcomes. Few challenges can be more fascinating to students than unraveling the often dramatic complications of cause. And nothing is more dangerous than a simple, monocausal explanation of past experiences and present problems.   

Finally, well-written historical narratives can also alert students to the traps of lineality and inevitability. Students must understand the relevance of the past to their own times, but they need also to avoid the trap of lineality, of drawing straight lines between past and present, as though earlier movements were being propelled teleologically toward some rendezvous with destiny in the late 20th century.

A related trap is that of thinking that events have unfolded inevitably--that the way things are is the way they had to be, and thus that individuals lack free will and the capacity for making choices. Unless students can conceive that history could have turned out differently, they may unconsciously accept the notion that the future is also inevitable or predetermined, and that human agency and individual action count for nothing. No attitude is more likely to feed civic apathy, cynicism, and resignation--precisely what we hope the study of history will fend off. Whether in dealing with the main narrative or with a topic in depth, we must always try, in one historian's words, to "restore to the past the options it once had."

STANDARD 3
The student engages in historical analysis and interpretation:

Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, personalities, behaviors, and institutions by identifying likenesses and differences. 
  2. Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating their differing motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears.
  3. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships bearing in mind multiple causation including (a) the importance of the individual in history; (b) the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs; and (c) the role of chance, the accidental and the irrational.
  4. Draw comparisons across eras and regions in order to define enduring issues as well as large-scale or long-term developments that transcend regional and temporal boundaries.
  5. Distinguish between unsupported expressions of opinion and informed hypotheses grounded in historical evidence.
  6. Compare competing historical narratives.  
  7. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by formulating examples of historical contingency, of how different choices could have led to different consequences.  
  8. Hold interpretations of history as tentative, subject to changes as new information is uncovered, new voices heard, and new interpretations broached.  
  9. Evaluate major debates among historians concerning alternative interpretations of the past.
  10. Hypothesize the influence of the past, including both the limitations and opportunities made possible by past decisions.
 

Assignment HI.3 History Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

View the following video. Using the above 10 forms of procedural knowledge, identify which ones are achieved in this lesson on explorers. Complete a typed paper with the following heading:

  1. Procedural Knowledge (PK): List the 10 forms of PK from above
    • Example: Compare competing historical narratives.
  2. Pedagogical Content Knowledge:
    • Example: During questioning about the three accounts of Charlemagne's coronation, the teacher was able to have students consider the implications of the different accounts based on their authors.
  3. Learner.Org 9. Explorers in North America camera
    • 26 minutes
    • Rob Cuddi, a fifth–grade teacher at Winthrop Middle School in Winthrop, Massachusetts, has been teaching for almost 30 years and has recently taken an active role in restructuring the social studies curriculum to accommodate both state and national standards. Mr. Cuddi’s lesson introduces the theme of exploration in North America, posing three essential questions: How have people in history affected our lives today?; How do the human and physical systems of the Earth interact?; and What role do economies play in the foundation of our history?

 

 

Site
Resources

History Home Page

Geography Home Page

Sunshine State Standards

History Web Resources


NCSS Recourse

The NCSS Themes of Social Studies

The NCSS Democratic Beliefs and Values

The NCSS Essentials of Social Studies Education


History's Frameworks

Hazards of History

 


History Standards

Content

Era 1
Era 2
Era 3
Era 4
Era 5
Era 6
Era 7
Era 8
Era 9
Era 10

Thinking

Standard 1: Chronological Thinking

Standard 2: Historical Comprehension

Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

Standard 4: Historical Research Capabilities

Standard 5: Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making