College of education

 

departmental course syllabus

 

The College of education is dedicated to the ideals of Collaboration, Academic Excellence, Research, and Ethics/Diversity.  These are key tenets in the Conceptual Framework of the College of Education.  Competence in these ideals will provide candidates in educator preparation programs with skills, knowledge, and dispositions to be successful in the schools of today and tomorrow.  For more information on the Conceptual Framework, visit: www.coedu.usf.edu/main/qualityassurance/ncate_visit_info_materials.html

 

 

 

1.  Course prefix and number: SCE 4237  (4 credits)

2.  Course title: SCIENCE / TECHNOLOGY / SOCIETY INTERACTION

3.  Regular instructors: Dr. Barbara S. Spector

4.  Course prerequisites: (none)

5.  Course description: Achieve an historical and philosophical understanding of 1) the nature of the scientific enterprise: interaction of science, technology, and society (STS), (2) how to teach STS including the use of computers and related technologies, and (3) intricacies of sample STS topics.

 

This course develops studentsí awareness of science and technology as human enterprises that take place in a social, environmental, and historical context.  Various interactions of science, technology, and society are explored in the context of STS issues relevant to the learners.  The learner constructs a grounded theory about the nature of the interaction of Science, Technology, and Society and its role in science education reform.  The instructor models constructivist teaching strategies. The goal of the course is to enable learners to construct a historical and philosophical understanding of (1) the nature of the scientific enterprise, including the interaction of science, technology, and society ; (2) the multiple dimensions and complexities of sample STS topics;  and (3) how to teach STS to diverse audiences.  This course fulfills four graduation requirements.1

 

6. Course goals and objectives

 

The participant will be able to

a)      describe the nature of science from both current and historical perspectives;

b)      describe the nature of technology from both current and historical perspectives;

c)      describe the interaction of science and technology with each other and society;

d)      construct an understanding of the nature of the scientific enterprise including the role of the interactions among science, technology, and society, and generate a grounded theory of  STS;

e)      use STS as the context to help learners construct basic science concepts;

f)        use a constructivist approach to teach diverse student audiences about the nature of the scientific enterprise and the interaction of science, technology, and society;

g)      explain the role of  STS in the science education reform movement.

 

7.  Content outline

 

(a)    paradigm shifts,

(b)   science versus pseudo-science, 

(c)    academic perspectives on STS,

(d)   historical perspectives of STS interactions,

(e)    New Liberal Arts program,

(f)     current environmental issues - hazardous waste

(g)    technology and psychology,

(h)    the AIDS dilemma,

(i)       site explorations,

(j)      multiple perspectives on STS in schooling.

 

8.  Evaluation of student outcomes

 

Assessment is embedded in instruction. Data for assessments will be collected from the following tasks that the students are required to complete:

 

a)      Participate in a study group and in electronic mail discussions.

b)      Review STS databases for publications, software, and videos.

c)      View the video taped series Connections and The Day the Universe Changed.  Write responses to questions handed out in class as part of your journal (see assignment # 9).           

d)      Read all print matter on the required reading list.

e)      Read two books chosen from the New Liberal Arts monograph series and share the contents of them with classmates.  Be thorough enough so that those who have not read the same books can speak intelligently about the particular example of  STS  to their future students.

f)        Develop and present an action plan addressing an STS issue.

g)      Final Project: Develop an original format to assess the degree to which you have integrated information from the experiences in this course into your own conceptual framework. Include your understanding of the scientific enterprise and a plan for teaching STS.  Share this plan with the class as your final assignment.  Be sure to include references to material from all the assigned readings, video tapes, and computer programs.

h)      Write response papers (exit memos) for each class session.

i)        Keep an extensive , reflective journal in which you integrate the meanings you are constructing from your various experiences related to STS.  Make a minimum of one entry each week.3

 

9.  Grading criteria

Your grade is based on the quality and quantity of your participation during on-campus and off-campus sessions and the quality and quantity of assignments you complete.  One of the criteria used to assess quality is your analytic, conceptual, and creative thinking as expressed through your oral communications in class and in written assignments. Consequently, attendance at all class sessions, for the entire session, is required.  Absences and tardiness will be reflected in your grade.  Failure to return all materials that have been loaned to you will result in a final grade of  ìFî.

 

10. Textbook and readings

 

Aikenhead (1992),  The integration of STS into science education.  Theory into practice, 31 (1), 27-35.

Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989).  Science for all Americans.  NY: Oxford Press.

American Association for the Advancement of Science.  (1994).  Benchmarks for science literacy.  NY: Oxford Press.

BSCS.  (1991).  Middle school science and technology (program preview).  Dubuque, IA:  Kendall/Hunt.

Carter, C. (1991). Science-technology-society and access to scientific knowledge.  Theory into practice , 30 (4), 273-279.

Hammond, A. L. (Ed.).  (1984). Century of the sciences: Twenty discoveries that changed our lives. Science 84 , 5 (9).

Hammond, A. L. (Ed.).  (1985)  The next step:  Twenty-five discoveries that could  change our lives.   Science 85, 6 (9).

Hurd, P.D. (1991).  Closing the educational gaps between science, technology, and society.  Theory into practice , 30 (4), 251-259.

Kuhn, T. (1970).  The structure of scientific revolutions.  Chicago:  The University of Chicago Press.

Monograph Series of the New Liberal Arts Program. (1989) Stony Brook, New York.

Nagasu, N. (1992).  What is STS approach: Historical and practical background.  Bulletin of society of japan science teaching, 33 (2), 78-88. 

Solomon J. & Aikenhead, G. (1994) STS education: International perspectives on reform.  Ways of Knowing  in Science series. NY; Teachers College, Columbia University

Spector, B.S.  (1990) Community resources for meaningful learning.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

Spector, B.S., and Lederman, N.  (1990).  Science and technology: Human enterprises.  Dubuque, Iowa:  Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

Spector, B.S. (1991).  Middle school and STS:  an ideal match.  International journal of science education.

Spector, B.S.  (1993).  Order out of chaos:  Restructuring schooling to reflect society's paradigm shift.  School Science and Mathematics Association   93 ( 1), 9-19.  

Yager, R.  (1990).  The science/technology/society movement in the United States: Its origins, evolution, and rationale.  Social Education,  54 (4),  198-201.

 

11(a)   ADA StatementStudents with disabilities are responsible for registering with the Office of Student Disabilities Services in order to receive special accommodations and services.   Please notify the instructor during the first week of classes if a reasonable accommodation for a disability is needed for this course.   A letter from the USF Disability Services Office must accompany this request.

 

11(b).  USF Policy on Religious Observances: 

Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in writing, by the second class meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

 

College of Education Departmental Course Syllabus

 

1)      Rationale for setting goals and objectives: what sources of information (e.g., research, best practices) support the formulation and selection of course goals and objectives.

 

Knowledge of how people learn science, the nature of science, and the reform movement in science education support the formulation and selection of course goals and objectives. The National Science Education Standards (NRC,1989) and Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS,19940 and Learning How To Learn (Novak & Gowin, 1984) are key sources of information.

 

2)      List the specific competencies addressed from the relevant national guidelines.

 

3)      Are there field-based experiences in this course?  If so, please briefly indicate nature and duration.

 

Yes.  There are field-based experiences in this course.  Students are required to be in schools for a minimum of 15 hours.  They are to interact and observe science teachers and classes.

 

4)      Is technology used in this course?  If so, please briefly indicate type of technology and how it is used to manage, evaluate and improve instruction.  Our students provided opportunities to access and/or demonstrate use of technology in instruction in this course?  If so, please briefly describe.  (See accomplished practice No. 12)

 

Yes.  Students are required to communicate on e-mail and to use the Internet as a resource for S.T.S. related information and S.T.S. lesson plans.

 

5)      List the specific competencies addressed from the Florida adopted subject area competencies, if applicable.

 

The Nature of Science

Standard 1: The student uses the scientific processes and habit of mind to solve problems.

Standard 2: The student understands that most natural events occur in comprehensible, consistent patterns.

Standard 3: The student understands that science, technology, and society are interwoven and interdependent.

 

6)      Are there any components of the course designed to prepare teacher candidate to help K-12 students achieve the Sunshine State Standards?  If so, please identify.

 

All components of the course for designed to prepare teacher candidates to achieve the Sunshine State Standards relating to the nature of science & the nature of technology and their interaction with society.

 


Attachment 1 (contíd)

 

MATRIX

 (For College of Education files only)

 

 

1.0  describe the nature of science from both current and historical perspectives;

paradigm shifts, science versus pseudo-science,

Journals

e-mail

original final project

Practice # 3 ñ Continuous Improvement

Practice # 4 ñ Critical Thinking

Practice # 8 ñ Knowledge of Subject

                        Matter

2.0  describe the nature of technology from both current and historical perspectives;

paradigm shifts, New Liberal Arts program,

Journals

e-mail

original final project

Practice # 8 - Knowledge of Subject

                      Matter

Practice # 12 - Technology

3.0 describe the interaction of science and technology with each other and society

paradigm shifts, academic perspectives on STS, historical perspectives of STS interactions,

Journals

e-mail

original final project

review of data bases

Practice # 12 - Technology

4.0  construct an understanding of the nature of the scientific enterprise including the role of the interactions among science, technology, and society, and generate a grounded theory of  STS;

 

 

academic perspectives on STS, historical perspectives of STS interactions, technology and psychology, the AIDS dilemma,

Journals

e-mail

original final project

Action plan

Practice # 4 ñ Critical Thinking

Practice # 8 ñ Knowledge of Subject

                       Matter

5.0 use STS as the context to help learners construct basic science concepts

current environmental issues - hazardous waste

Journals

e-mail

original final project Action plan

Practice # 8 ñ Knowledge of Subject

                       Matter

Practice # 10 - Planning

6.0  use a constructivist approach to teach diverse student audiences about the nature of the scientific enterprise and the interaction of science, technology, and society;

site explorations, multiple perspectives on STS in schooling.

Journals

e-mail

original final project

Action plan

Practice # 2 ñ Communication

Practice # 5 ñ Diversity

Practice #10 ñ Planning

7.0  explain the role of  STS in the science education reform movement.

site explorations, multiple perspectives on STS in schooling.

Journals

e-mail

original final project

Action plan

Practice # 8 ñ Knowledge of Subject

                       Matter

Practice # 12 - Technology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT II

 

Departmental Course Syllabus

 

Preprofessional Benchmarks for the Accomplished Practices

 

 

Practice #1 -- Assessment:    The preprofessional teacher collects and uses data gathered from a variety of sources.  These sources will include both traditional and alternate assessment strategies.  Furthermore, the teacher can identify and match the studentís instructional plan with their cognitive, social, linguistic, cultural, emotional, and physical needs.

 

Practice #2 -- Communication:  The preprofessional teacher recognizes the need for effective communication in the classroom and is in the process of acquiring techniques which she/he will use in the classroom.

 

Practice #3 -- Continuous Improvement:  The preprofessional teacher realizes that she/he is in the initial stages of a life-long learning process and that self reflection is one of the key components of that process.  While her/his concentration is, of necessity, inward and personal, the role of colleagues and school-based improvement activities increase as time passes.  The teacherís continued professional improvement is characterized by self reflection, work with immediate colleagues and teammates, and meeting the goals of a personal professional development plan.

 

Practice #4 -- Critical Thinking:  The preprofessional teacher is acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies activities designed to assist all students in demonstrating their ability to think creatively.

 

Practice #5 -- Diversity:  The preprofessional teacher establishes a comfortable environment which accepts and fosters diversity.  The teacher must demonstrate knowledge and awareness of varied cultures and linguistic backgrounds.  The teacher creates a climate of openness, inquiry, and support by practicing strategies [such] as acceptance, tolerance, resolution, and mediation.

 

Practice #6 -- Ethics:  The preprofessional teacher adheres to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession in Florida.

 

Practice #7 -- Human Development and Learning:  Drawing upon well established human development/learning theories and concepts and  a variety of information about students, the preprofessional teacher plans instructional activities.

 

Practice #8 -- Knowledge of Subject Matter:  The preprofessional teacher has a basic understanding of the subject matter and is beginning to understand that the subject is linked to other disciplines and can be applied to real world integrated settings.  The teacherís repertoire of teaching skills include a variety of means to assist student acquisition of new knowledge and skills using that knowledge.

 

Practice #9 -- Learning Environments:  The preprofessional teacher understands the importance of setting up effective learning environments and has techniques and strategies to use to do so including some that provide opportunities for student input into the processes. The teacher understands that she/he will need a variety of techniques and is working to increase knowledge and skills.

 

Practice #10 -- Planning:  The preprofessional teacher recognizes the importance of setting high expectations for all students.  The preprofessional teacher works with other professionals to design learning experiences that meet studentsí needs and interests.  The teacher candidate continually seeks advice/information from appropriate resources including feedback, interprets the information, and modifies her/his plans appropriately.  Planned instruction will incorporate a creative environment and utilize varied and motivational strategies and multiple resources for providing comprehensible instruction for all students.  Upon reflection, the teacher continuously refines outcome assessment and learning experiences.

 

Practice #11 -- Role of the Teacher:  The preprofessional teacher communicates and works cooperatively with families and colleagues to improve the educational experiences at the school.

 

Practice #12 -- Technology:  The preprofessional teacher uses technology as available at the school site and as appropriate to the learner.  She/he provides students with opportunities to actively use technology and facilitates access to the use of electronic resources.  The teacher also uses technology to manage, evaluate, and improve instruction.

 



1  This course fulfills four USF graduation requirements: (a) science certification, (b) computer applications, (c) an exit requirement in Major Works and Major Issues for the USFís general education core, and (d) a portion of  Floridaís Gordon Rule writing requirement.  Extensive reflective journaling by participants describing their growing understanding of STS is used to meet the last requirement which involves the development of discursive writing skills. This course is required of all science education majors at the University.   

3   The journal entries are used to satisfy Gordon Rule requirements, therefore must total at least 6,000 words.